MA Practice Two - Ezra Stoller

This image from photographer Ezra Stoller is of the structures and architecture of Taliesin West in Arizona, United States, 1940's. The building was owned by Frank Lloyd Wright - the photographs were not commissioned or payed for although the photographer took it upon himself to capture the building and all its industrial materials and geometric shapes amazingly well.

Sourced From: Saunders, W.S. (1990) Modern architecture: Photographs by Ezra Stoller. New York: Harry N. Abrams. (Image of Taliesin West, Arizona)

The structure seems out of place in the desert and the materials look heavy and make a statement of status, the architect seems to have integrated the building into the landscape well. I love the structural elements of this image, I can't help but feel that such a mass of materials and lines is unnecessary to the structure itself but makes a big impact decoratively - much like the vessels I have begun to create.

Sourced From: (Left) Saunders, W.S. (1990) Modern architecture: Photographs by Ezra Stoller. New York: Harry N. Abrams. (Image of Upjohn Company Corperate Headquarters) (Right) David Hockney's A Bigger Splash Sourced From: http://www.tate.org.uk

I love the perspective of the photograph of this building, this is the Upjohn Company Corporate Headquarters in Chicago. The building was designed by Bruce Graham. The photograph reminds me of David Hockneys 'A bigger Splash', perhaps it is the time period that the photograph was taken and the painting was created, perhaps the mood and the empty atmosphere. I feel that there are comparisons that can be drawn between the architecture and material qualities. The geometric shapes of the canopy of this piece are bold and defined even though they sink into the surface of the building. Perhaps inverting shapes into the surface of my vessel designs is something to consider.

Sourced From: Saunders, W.S. (1990) Modern architecture: Photographs by Ezra Stoller. New York: Harry N. Abrams. (Image of Wilson Commons Building at the University of Rochester)

Pei Cobb Freed & Partners 'Wilson Commons Building' at the University of Rochester, New York involves this amazingly detailed window which looks so complex and delicate but at the same time, impenetrable. The use of these triangular shapes together that tesselate to create a patterned surface mesmerise me. The same group of architects use these triangular structures within the roof in the East Building of the National Gallery of Art.

Sourced From: Saunders, W.S. (1990) Modern architecture: Photographs by Ezra Stoller. New York: Harry N. Abrams. (Image of National Gallery of Art)

This photograph reminds me of the detail within Deanna Petherbridges mark making drawings of textural structures. The ceiling almost looks as if I could be a flat pattern, but the three dimensional pattern becomes real when looking into the lines of the piece. This glass ceiling creates amazing shadows around the gallery, perhaps considering shadows or looking for shapes within shadows could be a useful exercise


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